Saturday, February 16, 2013

Sven In Action

A couple folks wanted to see a video of Sven in action. He works pretty well, but after a bit of a break-in period, I think he'll be even better.

I have no idea why the shavings are accordioned. Nothing is obstructing their exit and they don't bunch up at all in the throat. Maybe it has something to do with the higher bed angle. No clue. He works. And that's good enough for me.

To see the video in HD, click here.

 
The song is "Heartbreak Express" by Dolly Parton.

20 comments:

upriver said...

Beautiful work! Congratulations on a project well done. I have been enjoying following along, so thanks for sharing.

Jim A said...

Kari are you sure that is accordioning? It looks to me more like your shavings are trying to curl then they are bent back the opposite way by the steep angle. If this bending one way then the opposite repeats rapidly as you shave it will look like accordioned shavings when actually they are tightly curled in boh directions. I have some 55 degree angle planes that will do this on certain woods, but only certain woods. Have you tried several wood types and shave thicknesses? Accordioning will happen to everything because it is caused by a constriction. Curling won't. Accordioning is a flaw. Tight curling is just an interesting curiosity.

Jim

Kari Hultman said...

Thanks, upriver!

Jim, I think you're right about the curling on the steep angle. The shavings come out intact, so the plane does seem to be doing what it's supposed to. A friend on FB said that all his high angle planes do the same thing. This is the first H.A. plane I've ever used, so I didn't know what to expect. I'll play around with different woods and thicknesses and see what happens.

J.C. [the younger] said...

My experience in using planes w/o a chipbreaker leads to accordioned shavings. High angle or not. I think it's normal and not a flaw only a minor nuisance in having to pluck the shavings from the escapement. I keep a pencil or a Popsicle stick behind my ear at the ready whenever I push a plane, metal or otherwise. A leftover chop stick works great too. Sven works great from what I can tell. Heck, the proof is in the surface left behind not the condition of the "waste" material.

Ethan said...

Lovely plane, Kari. And I love seeing how it works.

But... er... not so sure Dolly Parton is the right music for a high angle chipcarved horned smoothing plane named Sven...

I was hoping for something more like the orchestral music for Conan the Barbarian. :)

Robin Wood said...

what a joy to use a tool like that, I love the carving and love that you called it Sven, none of my tools have names, I am not sure if I could but I like that you have.

Kari Hultman said...

J.C., the proof is in the surface as you say. :o) The shavings come out in a steady stream and don't stick at all. The mouth is too large for that to happen. I see an insert in Sven's future...

Ethan, you sound like Nancy! She said, "Why'd you use Dolly Parton??" Well....cuz.

Robin, not sure why only my planes have names. None of my other tools do. The planes just seem to have so much personality.

Ian W said...

It is wonderful that you have a functional and beautiful tool with which to work. More satisfying still that you made it yourself, I am sure.
Making a hand plan is on my bucket list, I even have the wood resting on a rack in my shop.
Thank you for all your interesting and informative blog postings.
Cheers, Ian W

CT Kelly said...

He's a beauty that No. 9. Beautiful carvings.

diversitywoodworks said...

Great job,
The shaving are a combination of a higher angle and no chip-breaker, but it matters not.

Mark Hays said...

Kari,
I'm a first-time blogger on your site, although I've bookmarked it. I was drawn to the video of Sven's "maiden" voyage, and now need to read and study all of your project's posts. What a wonderful creation to share with us! Kari, I have two questions: 1. Where or how did you get that 12/4 or 16/4 cherry? It's wonderful. 2. Did you take a plane-making class before creating this plane or others. Thank you for making my day better. Mark Hays

Mark Hays said...

Kari,
I am now a 2nd-time blogger to your site. . . I also meant to ask you which plane blades you prefer to use in your wooden planes. Thanks. Mark

Dave said...

Hi Kari

To quote "no clue. He works. And that's good enough for me". Interesting, my wife says the same thing about me!!!

Kari Hultman said...

Good luck with your plane build, Ian. It's a very fun project and very satisfying to make a tool that you can use.

Thank you, CT Kelly. :o)

Diversitywoodworks, this is the first high-angle plane I've ever used, so I didn't know if it would work the same or not. It handles a wee bit differently than a 45ยบ bed.

Mark, I got the lumber at Hearne Hardwoods in Oxford, PA. They keep 12/4 and 16/4 cherry in stock and it's gorgeous. I took a class many years ago on making a solid body raised panel plane with a skewed iron. It was very helpful, but I learned a lot on my own by making Sven. I make a lot of my own blades, but this one is from Lee Valley and I'm very happy with it.

Dave, sounds like you're well appreciated. ; )

Oldbury said...

Teriffic skills, this is why i like youtube so much, thanks for sharing your talents, time well spent watching you in action..

RunDMC said...

Kari, it's a thing of great beauty, congratulations and thanks for sharing with us. You are probably creating a type 2 chip (google it or read Hoadley's book on wood properties) because the angle of attack causes the wood fibers to fail immediately past the cutting edge (i.e. no chip breaker needed). That reduces tearout when planing against the grain. A low angle of attack creates a type 1 chip, in which the chip doesn't bend enough to fail, and these will look like a gossamer sheet, but as you know the downside is tearout when planing against the grain.

Kari Hultman said...

Thanks Oldbury. :o)

RunDMC, googled it and found tons of information. There's even a Wiki page devoted to chip types. Thank you!

Art said...

Upon reading your post, I remember a post by Chris Schwarz. I found it and it might enlighten your situation a little. I expect it may solve it. Not, that it's a big problem, but a little "tuning" may correct things. http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/reconsidering-chipbreakers-as-not-totally-evil

Kari Hultman said...

Thanks, Art, but my plane is a single iron--no chip breaker. I think the crinkle is due to the high angle of the bed. It works great, though—there's no clogging at all. Interesting info on Chris' post—I will keep that in mind for my planes with double irons. Thanks for passing it along.

K P in VT said...

I think the crinkle is from the shavings being so reluctant to leave that beautiful throat.