Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Horned Smoother Part III

Here is the layout for the throat, mouth, bed, abutments, and cheeks for my plane.

I referenced two books: Wooden Planes and How to Make Them, by David G. Perch and Robert S. Lee; and Making Traditional Wooden Planes, by John M. Whelan.



The two books are slightly different in their approach and presentation, and I made some slight revisions to suit my plane—so don't take my layout as gospel. If you can get ahold of some old wooden planes for reference, it would be helpful to you.













The pencil marks in the photos are pretty light, so I included two images (at right) with clearer layout lines and angles.

I also added images of the little coffin smoother (last image) that I made awhile ago so you can see the physical shape of the throat and abutment.

The lines on the blank that are at the very front and back represent cutoff lines (for the final length).






10 comments:

Jonathan said...

Very well illustrated Kari. So you aren't using a chip breaker? Any reason why?

Kari Hultman said...

It's just a personal preference, Jonathan. I like the 18th century and older planes that did not use them.

mike h said...

i enjoy reading your blog, it is one of a few that i keep coming back to. you inspire me to go out to the shop and try new things. thanks again

Kari Hultman said...

Thank you, Mike. :o)

Madhav Mehra said...

Kari, would you be kind enough to annotate the figure with the overall dimensions of the plane?

Kari Hultman said...

Sure, Madhav—the plane will be approximately 7" long x 2.25" high x 3" wide. It will taper a bit on the sides, so it will be a little less wide at the front and back. The blank is 8.625" long in case I decide it looks better longer. From the sole to the top of the horn is 4". I may change that dimension, too, as I work on it.

Madhav Mehra said...

Thanks. I know many have said it before me, but I think your work is really inspirational. i will try and build this along with you

Kari Hultman said...

I love it! We'll have our own group build. :o)

David North said...

These posts make me think I can give this style of plane making a go. Seems like you'd gain a lot in chiseling skill by trying it. I'm just curious about the geometry of the throat. Why does this plane (and the little one you already made) have those 2 angles at the throat rather than the single more open angle of your scrub plane. You'd think having it more open would give better chip clearance. Perhaps it allows better pressure just ahead of the blade? Thanks

Kari Hultman said...

David, the throats on these planes have two angles so that as you dress the sole and it wears away over time, the mouth doesn't open up as much as it would with just the one, forward-slanting, angle. Krenov planes have just one angle which slopes toward the toe, so the mouth opens up pretty quickly. My scrub plane does have two angles, but the lower one is rather close to the mouth opening. It's maybe only 1/4' tall. Mine is about 1".