Sunday, December 18, 2011

Storage Box: Finished

This storage box is based on an antique, the original of which has dovetailed corners and a drawer pull to make the stackable boxes easier to pull down from a shelf.

I simplified the design by using rabbeted corners and omitting the drawer pull.  However, I kept the beads at the top and bottom of each side board, and along the edge of the lid.

The bottom boards are beveled and slid into grooves, and the lid is rabbeted and fitted to the inside dimensions of the box.

The outer dimensions of the box, not including the lid, are 15" x 13" x 6.5".  The boards are a little thinner than 3/4" thick, and the beads are approximately 3/8".

On all surfaces, there are 8 coats of blonde shellac rubbed smooth with 0000 steel wool, and a coat of dark paste wax on the outside surfaces.

I had planned to drive some antique nails into the corners for appearance and to reinforce the structure, but I just can't bring myself to pound nails into that gorgeous Pennsylvania cherry.

You can't get much more basic than this design, but wood has a way of making even simple projects attractive.

23 comments:

Glenn said...

Nice job. I especially like the beading in the lid.

keithjfuji1439 said...

Very nice! I especially like the bead on the bottom. Personally I think some nice square cut nails would add character. But that pristine cherry does look so nice...

Jonathan said...

Nice job Kari. I really like the bead at the bottom

Kari Hultman said...

Thanks, guys! It's such a simple box that I hesitated to post it, but the wood is just so pretty. Plus, it's the only woodworking I've had time to work on lately....

Bob Easton said...

Simple beauty! Beautiful work Kari.

I'm wondering ... You mentioned 0000 steel wool. Having user it many times, I like the results but tire of the cleanup. Have you ever tried substituting a white "scotch-brite" pad instead? That is, I think, the softest of the plastic scrubbers.

... headed to the shop ...

Kari Hultman said...

Bob, I've tried using the scotch-brite pads, but have better luck with the steel wool. I use Liberon which is far better than the stuff you get at the big box stores. Maybe I haven't used the scotch-brite pads correctly? Do you use a light or heavy touch? Do you work through all the "grits"?

Nik Brown said...

Simple but elagent as usual. I love looking at your work!

Tergenev said...

It's a beautiful design, beautifully realized. I could see doing a whole large piece using this as the design template.

Stephen Shepherd said...

Kari,
You can do this, take a brad awl, make proper holes and drive in those nails, you know you should.

Stephen

Kari Hultman said...

Thank you, Nik and Tergenev. :o)

Stephen, my Mom has forbidden me from putting nails in this box. Sorry. Mom trumps everyone. However, I would like to know if you made your brad awl or if you found an antique. I'd love to have one for the times I do add nails. They seem like they'd be pretty easy to make from a regular awl.

Stephen Shepherd said...

I have several and they are all antique. I don't think a modern awl would work, the shaft has to be perfectly straight, no taper, short and stout. Double bevel chisel point on the end. They usually have a small bolster with a square tapered tang.

Stephen

Kari Hultman said...

Thanks for the information, Stephen. Very helpful. I'll get ahold of some tool steel and make my own. I've never come across one in antique stores or at shows.

Bob Easton said...

Kari asked: "Maybe I haven't used the scotch-brite pads correctly? Do you use a light or heavy touch? Do you work through all the "grits"? "

I haven't really given scotch-brite a good try either. Will do on the next project that wants a nice finish.

As for the other questions, yes, I'm heavy handed and any kind of grits one can eat are better than working through the grits w/sandpaper.

It's a beautiful box!

Paul Charlton said...

Just curious. How do you deal with the gluing end grain issue when using rabbeted corners?

ron howes said...

Kari, another masterpiece. There is no work I enjoy looking at more.

Ron

fairwoodworking said...

Simple is good. Sometimes what makes a piece is what you don't do rather than what you do do.

Great! I've just used "do do" in a comment.

So classy.

fairwoodworking said...

Simple is good. Sometimes what makes a piece is what you don't do rather than what you do do.

Great! I've just used "do do" in a comment.

So classy.

Kari Hultman said...

I'm with you, Bob. I try to avoid sandpaper if I can. And grits———>yum!

Paul, when I was building the box, I figured I would reinforce the glued rabbet joints with nails (which I didn't use). So if the glue fails, I can make Stephen Shepherd happy by driving some antique nails into the outside edges. I have glued rabbet joints like this before, though, and the glue has never failed. I've never used it on corners that get a lot of stress, however.

Thank you, Ron. :o)

FW, well played!

Anonymous said...

Kari,
What a well-honed talent! This is simply exquisite.

Valerie (Nancy's cousin)

Kari Hultman said...

Thank you, Valerie. :o)

Joe McGlynn said...

Simple and elegant, I like it. The profile on the lid and the beaded details set it apart from a simple box. Nix on the nails, they couldn't improve this piece. Between the wood and the finish the piece just glows.

Yasmien Nirvana said...

Looks like a perfect storage for old pictures and souvenirs! nice work Ma'am.

Pat said...

Nice crisp design.